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Tibetan history, as it has been recorded, is particularly focused on the history of Buddhism in Tibet.

This is partly due to the pivotal role this religion has played in the development of Tibetan and Mongol cultures and partly because almost all native historians of the country were Buddhist monks.

Kyide Nyigön's eldest son became ruler of the Mar-yul Ladakh region, and his two younger sons ruled western Tibet, founding the Kingdom of Guge and Pu-hrang.

At a later period the king of Guge's eldest son, Kor-re, also called Jangchub Yeshe-Ö (Byang Chub Ye shes' Od), became a Buddhist monk.

A civil war ensued, which effectively ended centralized Tibetan administration until the Sa-skya period.

Ösung's allies managed to keep control of Lhasa, and Yumtän was forced to go to Yalung, where he established a separate line of kings. The son of Ösung was Pälkhortsän (Dpal 'khor brtsan) (865–895 or 893–923).

In AD 108, "the Kiang or Tibetans, who were then entirely savage and lived a nomadic life west and south of the Koko-nor, attacked the Chinese posts of Gansu, threatening to cut the Dunhuang road.

Liang Kin, at the price of some fierce fighting, held them off." Similar incursions were repelled in AD 168-169 by the Chinese general Duan Gong.

The first externally confirmed contact with the Tibetan kingdom in recorded Tibetan history occurred when King Namri Löntsän (Gnam-ri-slon-rtsan) sent an ambassador to China in the early 7th century.

Thereafter Drigum Tsenpo and subsequent kings left corpses and the Bön conducted funerary rites.

In a later myth, first attested in the Maṇi bka' 'bum, the Tibetan people are the progeny of the union of the monkey Pha Trelgen Changchup Sempa and rock ogress Ma Drag Sinmo.

Nyatri Tsenpo is considered by traditional histories to have been the first king of the Yarlung Dynasty, named after the river valley where it's capital city was located, circa fifty-five miles south-east from present-day Lhasa.

Nyatri Tsenpo is said to have descended from a one-footed creature called the Theurang, having webbed fingers and a tongue so large it could cover his face.

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