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A new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows that Democrats enjoy popular support for these efforts. Fifty percent of Americans believe same-sex marriages should be recognized by law as valid, with the same rights as traditional marriages -- down slightly from 53% last year, but marking only the second time in Gallup's history of tracking this question that at least half of Americans have supported legal same-sex marriage. In the 2012 election, the data certainly points to an angry Independent vote that will not be favorable to President Obama. Fifty percent of Americans say they have a great deal or a fair amount of confidence in President Obama to do or to recommend the right thing for the economy, more than say the same about Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (42%). With the Republican presidential primary season essentially over and with the general election campaign now under way, President Barack Obama begins the race with a six-point lead over presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll. Women Vote Action Fund, they will pay the price in November. Four recent national polls, including three released in the past 24 hours, generally show the electorate dividing between President Obama and Mitt Romney along lines of class, gender and race familiar from the 2008 race. With voters continuing to focus on economic issues, Barack Obama holds a slim 49% to 45% advantage over Mitt Romney in the latest Pew Research Center survey of nearly 2,400 registered voters nationwide. Mitt Romney has emerged from the Republican primary season with the weakest favorability rating on record for a presumptive presidential nominee in ABC News/Washington Post polls since 1984, trailing a resurgent Barack Obama in personal popularity by 21 percentage points. Mitt Romney is supported by 47% of national registered voters and Barack Obama by 45% in the inaugural Gallup Daily tracking results from April 11-15. Perhaps most interesting, the findings emerging out of advances in microtechnology are a window into the striking differences in the tastes and interests of liberal and conservatives, Democrats and Republicans.

While the President is upside down with his job approval on a majority of issue areas, with independents, his disapproval measurements are higher than average, and in some cases significantly higher. Democrats face twin challenges: first, securing credit for their economic successes while extending the debate over a level playing field for America's middle class beyond taxes to include robust plans for further job creation, and second, bringing Romney's record and vision for the future into stark relief. The first USA TODAY/Gallup Swing States Poll since the GOP settled on a presumptive nominee shows big challenges for each side: Mitt Romney in generating enthusiasm and a personal connection with his supporters, and Barack Obama in convincing Americans he should be trusted to manage a fragile economy. With just over six months until Election Day, an analysis of the emerging electoral map by The New York Times found that the outcome would most likely be determined by how well President Obama and Mitt Romney perform in nine tossup states. I'd argue that, even before the third-party ads, the "outside" polls, and even the Lugar/Mourdock campaigns themselves, the outcome was settled by two simple actions that happened months ago. I can tell you firsthand that there are widespread misconceptions about conservative voters -- what they believe in and what they are looking for from their leaders. presidential election and there's a general consensus in both camps about who, to paraphrase former President George W. The swing groups are constituencies that went for Barack Obama in 2008 and voted Republican in the 2010 congressional elections, or voting blocs in which the premium is passion not preference. By the count of one Democratic pollster, roughly 40 presidential election polls have been released in the past seven weeks -- about one a day, with a day off every week. Both Obama and Romney are supported by 90% of their respective partisans. As tax filing day looms, Americans fall into two closely matched camps: those who believe the amount they pay in federal income tax is too high (46%) and those who consider it "about right" (47%). Among other things, Democrats and Republicans differ in the entertainment they prefer, the restaurants they go to, the drinks they chose and the Web sites they visit. Six in 10 Americans favor Congress' passing the so-called "Buffett Rule," which would mandate a minimum 30% tax rate for Americans with a household income of

A new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows that Democrats enjoy popular support for these efforts. Fifty percent of Americans believe same-sex marriages should be recognized by law as valid, with the same rights as traditional marriages -- down slightly from 53% last year, but marking only the second time in Gallup's history of tracking this question that at least half of Americans have supported legal same-sex marriage. In the 2012 election, the data certainly points to an angry Independent vote that will not be favorable to President Obama. Fifty percent of Americans say they have a great deal or a fair amount of confidence in President Obama to do or to recommend the right thing for the economy, more than say the same about Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (42%). With the Republican presidential primary season essentially over and with the general election campaign now under way, President Barack Obama begins the race with a six-point lead over presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll. Women Vote Action Fund, they will pay the price in November. Four recent national polls, including three released in the past 24 hours, generally show the electorate dividing between President Obama and Mitt Romney along lines of class, gender and race familiar from the 2008 race. With voters continuing to focus on economic issues, Barack Obama holds a slim 49% to 45% advantage over Mitt Romney in the latest Pew Research Center survey of nearly 2,400 registered voters nationwide. Mitt Romney has emerged from the Republican primary season with the weakest favorability rating on record for a presumptive presidential nominee in ABC News/Washington Post polls since 1984, trailing a resurgent Barack Obama in personal popularity by 21 percentage points. Mitt Romney is supported by 47% of national registered voters and Barack Obama by 45% in the inaugural Gallup Daily tracking results from April 11-15. Perhaps most interesting, the findings emerging out of advances in microtechnology are a window into the striking differences in the tastes and interests of liberal and conservatives, Democrats and Republicans.While the President is upside down with his job approval on a majority of issue areas, with independents, his disapproval measurements are higher than average, and in some cases significantly higher. Democrats face twin challenges: first, securing credit for their economic successes while extending the debate over a level playing field for America's middle class beyond taxes to include robust plans for further job creation, and second, bringing Romney's record and vision for the future into stark relief. The first USA TODAY/Gallup Swing States Poll since the GOP settled on a presumptive nominee shows big challenges for each side: Mitt Romney in generating enthusiasm and a personal connection with his supporters, and Barack Obama in convincing Americans he should be trusted to manage a fragile economy. With just over six months until Election Day, an analysis of the emerging electoral map by The New York Times found that the outcome would most likely be determined by how well President Obama and Mitt Romney perform in nine tossup states. I'd argue that, even before the third-party ads, the "outside" polls, and even the Lugar/Mourdock campaigns themselves, the outcome was settled by two simple actions that happened months ago. I can tell you firsthand that there are widespread misconceptions about conservative voters -- what they believe in and what they are looking for from their leaders. presidential election and there's a general consensus in both camps about who, to paraphrase former President George W. The swing groups are constituencies that went for Barack Obama in 2008 and voted Republican in the 2010 congressional elections, or voting blocs in which the premium is passion not preference. By the count of one Democratic pollster, roughly 40 presidential election polls have been released in the past seven weeks -- about one a day, with a day off every week. Both Obama and Romney are supported by 90% of their respective partisans. As tax filing day looms, Americans fall into two closely matched camps: those who believe the amount they pay in federal income tax is too high (46%) and those who consider it "about right" (47%). Among other things, Democrats and Republicans differ in the entertainment they prefer, the restaurants they go to, the drinks they chose and the Web sites they visit. Six in 10 Americans favor Congress' passing the so-called "Buffett Rule," which would mandate a minimum 30% tax rate for Americans with a household income of $1 million or more per year.And the vast majority of those identifiers and leaners strongly prefer their own partys candidates and policies to those of the opposing party. By 59% to 38%, more Americans continue to disapprove than approve of President Barack Obama's handling of the economy.

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A new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows that Democrats enjoy popular support for these efforts. Fifty percent of Americans believe same-sex marriages should be recognized by law as valid, with the same rights as traditional marriages -- down slightly from 53% last year, but marking only the second time in Gallup's history of tracking this question that at least half of Americans have supported legal same-sex marriage. In the 2012 election, the data certainly points to an angry Independent vote that will not be favorable to President Obama. Fifty percent of Americans say they have a great deal or a fair amount of confidence in President Obama to do or to recommend the right thing for the economy, more than say the same about Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (42%). With the Republican presidential primary season essentially over and with the general election campaign now under way, President Barack Obama begins the race with a six-point lead over presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll. Women Vote Action Fund, they will pay the price in November. Four recent national polls, including three released in the past 24 hours, generally show the electorate dividing between President Obama and Mitt Romney along lines of class, gender and race familiar from the 2008 race. With voters continuing to focus on economic issues, Barack Obama holds a slim 49% to 45% advantage over Mitt Romney in the latest Pew Research Center survey of nearly 2,400 registered voters nationwide. Mitt Romney has emerged from the Republican primary season with the weakest favorability rating on record for a presumptive presidential nominee in ABC News/Washington Post polls since 1984, trailing a resurgent Barack Obama in personal popularity by 21 percentage points. Mitt Romney is supported by 47% of national registered voters and Barack Obama by 45% in the inaugural Gallup Daily tracking results from April 11-15. Perhaps most interesting, the findings emerging out of advances in microtechnology are a window into the striking differences in the tastes and interests of liberal and conservatives, Democrats and Republicans.

While the President is upside down with his job approval on a majority of issue areas, with independents, his disapproval measurements are higher than average, and in some cases significantly higher. Democrats face twin challenges: first, securing credit for their economic successes while extending the debate over a level playing field for America's middle class beyond taxes to include robust plans for further job creation, and second, bringing Romney's record and vision for the future into stark relief. The first USA TODAY/Gallup Swing States Poll since the GOP settled on a presumptive nominee shows big challenges for each side: Mitt Romney in generating enthusiasm and a personal connection with his supporters, and Barack Obama in convincing Americans he should be trusted to manage a fragile economy. With just over six months until Election Day, an analysis of the emerging electoral map by The New York Times found that the outcome would most likely be determined by how well President Obama and Mitt Romney perform in nine tossup states. I'd argue that, even before the third-party ads, the "outside" polls, and even the Lugar/Mourdock campaigns themselves, the outcome was settled by two simple actions that happened months ago. I can tell you firsthand that there are widespread misconceptions about conservative voters -- what they believe in and what they are looking for from their leaders. presidential election and there's a general consensus in both camps about who, to paraphrase former President George W. The swing groups are constituencies that went for Barack Obama in 2008 and voted Republican in the 2010 congressional elections, or voting blocs in which the premium is passion not preference. By the count of one Democratic pollster, roughly 40 presidential election polls have been released in the past seven weeks -- about one a day, with a day off every week. Both Obama and Romney are supported by 90% of their respective partisans. As tax filing day looms, Americans fall into two closely matched camps: those who believe the amount they pay in federal income tax is too high (46%) and those who consider it "about right" (47%). Among other things, Democrats and Republicans differ in the entertainment they prefer, the restaurants they go to, the drinks they chose and the Web sites they visit. Six in 10 Americans favor Congress' passing the so-called "Buffett Rule," which would mandate a minimum 30% tax rate for Americans with a household income of $1 million or more per year.

And the vast majority of those identifiers and leaners strongly prefer their own partys candidates and policies to those of the opposing party. By 59% to 38%, more Americans continue to disapprove than approve of President Barack Obama's handling of the economy.

However, his approval rating on the economy is up from 30% in November after descending to a term-low 26% in August. A plurality of the public (41%) believes young adults, rather than middle-aged or older adults, are having the toughest time in today's economy.

million or more per year.

And the vast majority of those identifiers and leaners strongly prefer their own partys candidates and policies to those of the opposing party. By 59% to 38%, more Americans continue to disapprove than approve of President Barack Obama's handling of the economy.

However, his approval rating on the economy is up from 30% in November after descending to a term-low 26% in August. A plurality of the public (41%) believes young adults, rather than middle-aged or older adults, are having the toughest time in today's economy.

And just 19 percent of whites say that racism is a big problem in America, vs. Likewise, most campaigns are decided by the popular vote, not the details of the Electoral College.

First, Richard Lugar decided to seek reelection, and second, Richard Mourdock emerged as his ONLY challenger. President Obama leads former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney in Virginia, but voters in the commonwealth are evenly divided on the White House's major policies, a new Washington Post poll shows. New research by a team of psychologists from Canada, Italy and Switzerland shows that undecideds are not impartial, but instead reveal a preference for information that confirms their gut reactions. Let's look closer at this key demographic and debunk some of the biggest whoppers. Majorities of Americans say that global warming and clean energy should be among the nation's priorities, want more action by elected officials, corporations, and citizens themselves, and support a variety of climate change and energy policies, including holding fossil fuel companies responsible for all the "hidden costs" of their products. Opinions about a pair of contentious social issues, gun control and gay marriage, have changed substantially since previous presidential campaigns. Majorities of both Democrats and independents favor the policy, while a majority of Republicans oppose it. A majority of Republicans say for the first time that the war in Afghanistan has not been worth fighting, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll that comes as the continuing U. presence in that country is emerging as a key point of contention in the presidential race. With Rick Santorum's exit from the presidential race, Mitt Romney can at last turn his attention to the general election.

On gun control, Americans have become more conservative; on gay marriage, they have become more liberal. Approximately four months since Harvard IOP polling indicated that Barack Obama's approval ratings among 18- to 29- year olds reached new lows, there is evidence to suggest that the President and Democrats more broadly are beginning to regain the approval of this important segment of the electorate. A month of intense media focus on the Affordable Care Act, spurred by the three days of oral arguments in the Supreme Court over a case challenging the law, did little to change Americans' basic view on the health reform law. Americans are fed up with Congress and a federal government perpetually frozen in conflict, but voters remain sharply split over how to ease the gridlock in the nation's capital, according to a new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. In 2008 less than one-third of Hispanic voters supported the Republican nominee for President. Compared to 2008, President Obama is underperforming among this critically important voting bloc in battleground states where Hispanic voters will be the determining factor. He'll have to start by convincing his own party that his candidacy isn't a lost cause. [A] review of what Americans know about the political parties shows that the public is better informed about the partisan affiliations of two popular recent presidents -- Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton -- than it is about the positions of the parties on key issues that dominate the current national debate. More Americans think Supreme Court justices will be acting mainly on their partisan political views than on a neutral reading of the law when they decide the constitutionality of President Obama's health-care law, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. With the general-election campaign beginning to take shape, President Obama holds clear advantages over Mitt Romney on personal attributes and a number of key issues, but remains vulnerable to discontent with the pace of the economic recovery, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. Afghans express a growing sense that the Taliban have become more moderate, and the public broadly supports a negotiated settlement with them -- even if that means ceding government control of some provinces, the latest Afghan Futures survey has found. We find that Swing Independents are "opportunity" voters -- preferring an optimistic, opportunity framework on the economy over one based on fairness. Opportunity addresses their anxieties about the future, concerns that America is slipping, doubts about how the next generation will succeed, and questions over how we will strengthen our economy. President Barack Obama's job approval rating averaged 46% in March, up from 45% in January and February, and significantly improved over his term-low 41% monthly averages recorded last summer and fall. Majorities of both whites (72%) and blacks (89%) believe the country is divided by race, the poll finds.

If these groups are representative of this demographic at large, it will be a tall task to counter the disillusionment many feel due to a pattern of over-promising and under-delivering. Americans remain overwhelmingly against requiring individuals to purchase health insurance, but they divide in half about the health care law that President Obama signed in 2010, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. The recent national Reason-Rupe poll of 1200 adults finds 65 percent of Americans are open to changing Medicare for those under 55 years old into a program that gives individuals a credit to purchase a private insurance plan. Yet his success has not erased old doubts or stereotypes about his party on these issues. A new survey finds signs of public uneasiness with the mixing of religion and politics. Supreme Court should throw out either the individual mandate in the federal health care law or the law in its entirety, signaling the depth of public disagreement with that element of the Affordable Care Act. At a time of rising gas prices, the public's energy priorities have changed. This year's tumultuous Republican presidential race has underscored the dominance of whites, especially older white voters, in the GOP.

The number of people who say there has been too much religious talk by political leaders stands at an all-time high since the Pew Research Center began asking the question more than a decade ago. Mitt Romney's resounding win in the Illinois primary Tuesday demonstrated his solidifying hold on the GOP's upscale managerial wing, and deepened the question of whether rival Rick Santorum can appeal to a broad enough segment of Republican voters to truly challenge the front-runner's lead for the nomination. An improved sense that he understands voters' problems boosted Mitt Romney to victory in the Illinois primary, as did a less religiously focused, less strongly conservative electorate than he's faced in other contests, especially to the south. More Americans continue to view the development of alternative energy sources as a higher priority than the increased production of oil, coal and natural gas, but the gap has narrowed considerably over the past year. The power of campaigns to create and motivate new swing voters dovetails with the political strategy of driving polarization. Despite what you might have learned in Economics 101, people aren't always selfish. When people feel that a group they value -- be it racial, religious, regional or ideological -- is under attack, they rally to its defense, even at some cost to themselves. In a trend with important implications for the presidential election, the latest Allstate/National Journal Heartland Monitor poll released today shows President Obama's strongest groups in the electorate expressing the most optimism about the trajectory of the economy. Republican voters who prefer Newt Gingrich for the party's 2012 presidential nomination are as likely to name Mitt Romney as their second choice as they are to name Rick Santorum, suggesting the race would not tilt in Santorum's favor if Gingrich dropped out. Faith has emerged as a significant fault line in the Republican race for president, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll, which shows that Rick Santorum's supporters seek a much stronger role for religion in American politics than do voters who support rival Mitt Romney. After Tuesday's contests in Alabama and Mississippi, exit polls have been conducted in 16 states that have held Republican primaries or caucuses. Opinions are far less positive, however, about two other major initiatives to bolster the economy -- the 2008 bank bailout and the 2009 stimulus plan. President Barack Obama is enjoying a mini-renaissance in California.

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